Family-Friendly Spaces

Resources below will assist you in planning and implementing family-friendly spaces on your campus. View examples from other postsecondary institutions; read scholarly and professional articles and reports; and consult other resources like professional organizations.

POSTSECONDARY EXAMPLES

 

Oregon State University

Oregon State University lists family-friendly spaces on its website, including children's play areas at multiple sites and a commercial kitchen students may access, air hockey, couches, rocking chairs, and more in Champinefu Lodge.

University of California - San Diego

The University of California - San Diego provides parenting students with a child-friendly study area. The room contains carpeting, comfortable seating, tables, white board, and children's games and toys, and is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania's Family Center offers a family-friendly lounge, reading room, private lactation spaces, child nap area, kitchen, games and toys, and book library.

University of Toronto - Mississauga

The University of Toronto - Mississauga produces a map identifying family spaces on campus along with a listing of amenities within those spaces.

University of Washington - Bothell

The University of Washington - Bothell has dedicated several family-friendly spaces throughout campus for parenting students to meet and study. Spaces include children's books, toys, and games. 

ARTICLES & REPORTS

 
Derr, V., & Tarantini, E. (2015). "Because we are all people": Outcomes and reflections from young people's participation in the planning and
      design of child-friendly public spaces. The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, 21(12), 1534-1556. Retrieved from
      https://doi.org/10.1080/13549839.2016.1145643
Keyes, K. (2017). Welcoming spaces: Supporting parenting students at the academic library. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 43(4), 319-
      328. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2017.06.001
 
Nykiforuk, C.I.J., Hewes, J., Belon, A.P., Paradis, D., Gallagher, E., Gokiert, R., Bisanz, J., & Nieuwendyk., L. (2018). Evaluating child-friendly
      spaces: Insights from a participatory mixed methods study of a municipality's free-play preschool and space. Cities and Health, 1-15.
      Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1080/23748834.2018.1548894
Petit, J. (2014). A family-friendly study room for student-parents and their children at Portland State University Library. OLA Quarterly, 20(1), 36-
      39. Retrieved from https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://scholar.google.com/scholar?
      hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C47&q=family+friendly+space+on+campus&btnG=&httpsredir=1&article=1153&context=ulib_fac
Play England. (n.d.). Design for play: A guide to creating successful play spaces. Retrieved from http://playengland.org.uk/
       media/70684/design-for-play.pdf
Stonehouse, A. (2011). The "third" teacher: Creating child friendly learning spaces. Putting Children First, 38(1), 12-14. Retrieved
      from http://www.imagineeducation.com.au/files/CHC30113/NCAC_20_20The_20third_20teacher_ChildFriendlySpaces.pdf
 
The Local Initiatives Support Corporation. (2005). Community investment collaborative for kids: Resource guide 2. Retrieved
       from http://www.lisc.org/media/filer_public/ef/02/ef02cf88-eef9-4091-9f96-aa03f88931cb/2005_cick_guide_vol2_designing.pdf
UNICEF. (n.d.). A practical guide for developing child friendly spaces. Retrieved from https://www.unicef.org/protection/
       A_Practical_Guide_to_Developing_Child_Friendly_Spaces_-_UNICEF_(2).pdf
Wendel, A.M., Dannenberg, A.L., & Frumkin, H. (2008). Designing and building healthy places for children. International Journal for Environment
       and Health, 2(3/4), 338-355. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/healthyplaces/publications/designing_and_building_healthy_
       places_for_children.pdf
 

OTHER RESOURCES

 

American Society of Interior Designers

ASID's vision is to advance the profession and communicate the impact of interior design to enhance the human experience.

National Association for the Education of Young Children

NAEYC is a professional membership organization that works to promote high-quality early learning for all young children, birth through age 8, by connecting early childhood practice, policy, and research.

National Institute of Building Sciences

The National Institute of Building Sciences provides a section on designing and building Child Care spaces on its website. 

Spaces for Children

Spaces for Children specializes in classroom and facility design for early childhood programs. The Co-founder and Director, Louis Torelli, has authored numerous articles and a book on environmental design for early childhood programs and is on the faculty for The Program for Infant/Toddler Care Institutes.

The American Institute of Architects

The AIA is the voice of the architectural profession and a resource for its members in service to society.

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